What's The Diff?

The things Quicken Loans team members care about and want to share with the world

Japan’s Mini Houses are Cool!

Microhouse1 Leave it to the Japanese to take something as uncool as a 300 sq. ft. home and make it very cool.

I guess that's what happens when land is at a super premium.

It's hard for me to imagine that, coming from Detroit, where land is pretty much as cheap as it gets.

But evidently, Japan is a little different than Detroit and the good people there make the best of a difficult situation.

Recently, NPR.org ran a very good article on Japan's tiny homes, In Japan, Living Large in Really Tiny Houses. Here is a bit from the article:

The Japanese have long endured crowded cities and scarce living space, with homes so humble a scornful European official once branded them rabbit hutches.

But in recent years, Japanese architects have turned necessity into virtue, vying to design unorthodox and visually stunning houses on remarkably narrow pieces of land. In the process, they are also redefining the rules of home design.

Few Americans would consider a parking-space-sized lot as an adequate site to build a house. But in Japan, homes are rising on odd parcels of land, some as tiny as 300 square feet.

Yet the term "house" doesn't really do justice to these eye-catching architectural gems, fashioned from a high-tech palette of materials like glittering glass cubes, fiber reinforced plastic and super-thin membranes of steel.

I just got back from two weeks in Japan and I love it there. It's a great place. I recommend all DIFF readers get over there if you can.

If Japan isn't on your radar in the near future, just read the rest of the article linked above.

Pretty darn cool. 

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Today's Date:
Wednesday, April 26, 2017